How many years does a hip replacement last for.?

My hip replacement was done in 1995, and seems to still be fine, but I know they only have a certain life.

Here is a table that indicates the typical longevity of a hip prosthesis based on age at operation and type of fixation:

http://totaljoints.info/expectations_and_satisfaction.htm

As you can see from the table in the above link, older, less active people are less hard on their fake joint and therefore more likely to still have the functional implant 25 years later. On the other hand, the youngest hip replacement patients (defined as under 50 at operation) are less likely to still have a functioning joint at 25 years, probably due in part to the fact that younger people (especially males) are more active and can be particularly hard on their hips. The other table indicates a slight difference in longevity based on type of fixation (cemented vs. non-cemented) over a 10-yr period.

What may change future results is the increased use of more durable materials for the bearing – namely ceramic/ceramic and metal/metal. Both of these bearings generate far fewer wear particles than the old metal/poly combination which has been the standard for many years. The reason: wear particles may cause osteolysis of the bone which in turn can cause loosening of the prosthesis and require revision surgery. C/C or M/M bearings generate far fewer particles, hence the hope that the prosthesis will last longer. Time will tell in all of this, of course. And no one can predict with certainty how long an implant will last. But cautious educated guesses are possible based on past results. Some are concerned about M/M bearings and problems with metal ions in the body. And, osteolysis isn’t the only reason for failure of an implanted hip.

For more information on wear rates of different materials and loosening:

http://totaljoints.info/bearing_surfaces.htm

http://totaljoints.info/materials_for_total_hip_prosthes.htm

http://totaljoints.info/LOOSENINGTOTALJOINTS.htm#3

Incidentally, the website http://totaljoints.info has been developed by an ortho surgeon as a service to patients. It has all sorts of information and I recommend it to all who have or are contemplating a hip (or knee) replacement. It appears in (slightly fractured) English translation. Some of the data cited has been compiled from the Swedish hip registry – they have tracked every hip replacement performed in that country and the data that it reveals is very informative. I wish the US had such a registry. We could learn a lot.

Anyhow, it’s good news that your hip still is functioning well. Take care of it and it will likely last you a long time. I’ve had my two hip replacements for over 5 years and I expect to have them for many more.

4 thoughts on “How many years does a hip replacement last for.?

  1. Your Orthopedic Surgeon should have given you that Information. It depends what kind of appliance was used. With the plutonium hip replacement that is being used now the expectations are for 18 Years. Can you still call his office to verify the time. It is great news that you are doing so well after 9 years, are you still going for check ups? Best of luck , keep well.
    References :

  2. Here is a table that indicates the typical longevity of a hip prosthesis based on age at operation and type of fixation:
    http://totaljoints.info/expectations_and_satisfaction.htm
    As you can see from the table in the above link, older, less active people are less hard on their fake joint and therefore more likely to still have the functional implant 25 years later. On the other hand, the youngest hip replacement patients (defined as under 50 at operation) are less likely to still have a functioning joint at 25 years, probably due in part to the fact that younger people (especially males) are more active and can be particularly hard on their hips. The other table indicates a slight difference in longevity based on type of fixation (cemented vs. non-cemented) over a 10-yr period.

    What may change future results is the increased use of more durable materials for the bearing – namely ceramic/ceramic and metal/metal. Both of these bearings generate far fewer wear particles than the old metal/poly combination which has been the standard for many years. The reason: wear particles may cause osteolysis of the bone which in turn can cause loosening of the prosthesis and require revision surgery. C/C or M/M bearings generate far fewer particles, hence the hope that the prosthesis will last longer. Time will tell in all of this, of course. And no one can predict with certainty how long an implant will last. But cautious educated guesses are possible based on past results. Some are concerned about M/M bearings and problems with metal ions in the body. And, osteolysis isn’t the only reason for failure of an implanted hip.

    For more information on wear rates of different materials and loosening:
    http://totaljoints.info/bearing_surfaces.htm
    http://totaljoints.info/materials_for_total_hip_prosthes.htm
    http://totaljoints.info/LOOSENINGTOTALJOINTS.htm#3

    Incidentally, the website http://totaljoints.info has been developed by an ortho surgeon as a service to patients. It has all sorts of information and I recommend it to all who have or are contemplating a hip (or knee) replacement. It appears in (slightly fractured) English translation. Some of the data cited has been compiled from the Swedish hip registry – they have tracked every hip replacement performed in that country and the data that it reveals is very informative. I wish the US had such a registry. We could learn a lot.

    Anyhow, it’s good news that your hip still is functioning well. Take care of it and it will likely last you a long time. I’ve had my two hip replacements for over 5 years and I expect to have them for many more.
    References :

  3. It really depends on your activity level. Typical range is 20-30 years.
    References :
    I am a PT (Physical Therapist).

  4. help it last longer with a chiropractor and massage therapist

    Much pain is from muscles below is an example of what may help (based on headaches).
    Begin with a couple swigs of molasses or a couple of bananas daily – magnesium (which regulates many things in the body) and potassium (a needed building block for muscles).
    Drink at least 1/2 gallons of water per day. Running a body low on water is like running a car low on oil is the analogy the head of neurology at UCDavis told my husband about 10 years ago.

    Now to the cause – muscles – your back, neck shoulders and head have tender spots. They are knots in the fibers of the muscles called trigger points. It makes the muscles tight which makes them press on nerves and other things causing the pain.

    The cure – start with a professional massage, you will also want to go back over any place you can get to 6-12 times per session up to 6 times per day rubbing (or lightly scratching on your head) every where that is tender until the knots go away. The place where the skull connects to the spine press up under the edge of the skull (to get to those muscles).

    For more information read The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Davies. It teaches what to do and where the pain comes from.
    References :

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