What is the best treatment for a 90 year old woman that needs a hip replacement?

Obviously a hip replacement is too dangerous for her at her age and she would never survive it or walk again. Thank you.

Actually I don’t think your assumptions about her recovery or survival from such an operation are warranted in all cases. I’ll use my own MIL as an example: she is 92 yrs old and very active & healthy for her age. She lives on her own and still drives. If I have to live that long I’d like to be just like her. If she had osteoarthritis in her hips that was so bad and painful that it interfered with her activities and she couldn’t walk or sleep well, and if a surgeon agreed that she was healthy enough and could reap even a few active, pain-free years from a hip replacement, then I suspect that she might consider it if her doctor cleared her for the surgery.

So I don’t think it is always obvious that a 90-yr-old person would not survive such surgery. It must be considered on a case-by-case basis. I also don’t think you can assume that a 90-yr-old would never walk again after hip replacement surgery.

My point: all nonegenarians are not alike. Medical decisions must be based on evaluation of the individual’s current health status and life-style.

I’ve had both of my hips replaced in separate surgeries and have seen first-hand how crippling osteoarthritis can be, and how wonderful it is to now be pain-free, walking, and having my life back.

If a person is not healthy enough for surgery, then really the only "treatment" for advanced arthritis is walking aids, wheelchairs, pain meds, & exercise.

7 thoughts on “What is the best treatment for a 90 year old woman that needs a hip replacement?

  1. well dude, i dont know seems to me that at age of 90 any treatment would only make everything worst maby its just better to get her a wheel chair than to risk her
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  2. Ensure that she is free from pain and infections. I believe a loving environment with Family visiting and taking care of all her needs will ease the fear and concerns of having a hip replacement.
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  3. Pain medication unless she is not completely put under. My husband’s grandfather died after replacement close to that age. He had severe jaundice before the surgery.

    The complications and possible outcome are too severe unless carefully monitored…..this should be a consult between the lady and her doctors with the cost/benefit/pain ramifications carefully evaluated.
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    work in insurance

  4. Yes, at 90 you are looking at alot of risks on top of health, and past medical issues. You first have to go with her wishes. If she is unable to make the decision make the best choice for her, not what you want. The doctor will give you the options ahead. Remember quality of life is greater than quantity. Ensure she is pain free. As for ambulation there are other means to help. Physical and occupational therapies can help learn and build new ways of getting around. Good Luck!
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  5. If she is in fair health , I would not be so quick to say that she would not survive. Pretty routine these days and the recovery is so much quicker, if she has been living in excruciating pain all these years , it could give her motivation and happiness for several more.
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  6. Actually I don’t think your assumptions about her recovery or survival from such an operation are warranted in all cases. I’ll use my own MIL as an example: she is 92 yrs old and very active & healthy for her age. She lives on her own and still drives. If I have to live that long I’d like to be just like her. If she had osteoarthritis in her hips that was so bad and painful that it interfered with her activities and she couldn’t walk or sleep well, and if a surgeon agreed that she was healthy enough and could reap even a few active, pain-free years from a hip replacement, then I suspect that she might consider it if her doctor cleared her for the surgery.

    So I don’t think it is always obvious that a 90-yr-old person would not survive such surgery. It must be considered on a case-by-case basis. I also don’t think you can assume that a 90-yr-old would never walk again after hip replacement surgery.

    My point: all nonegenarians are not alike. Medical decisions must be based on evaluation of the individual’s current health status and life-style.

    I’ve had both of my hips replaced in separate surgeries and have seen first-hand how crippling osteoarthritis can be, and how wonderful it is to now be pain-free, walking, and having my life back.

    If a person is not healthy enough for surgery, then really the only "treatment" for advanced arthritis is walking aids, wheelchairs, pain meds, & exercise.
    References :

  7. well my 92yr old gran (93 in April) just had her hip replaced 2 days ago and it was bloodless surgery and it went smoothly she is very well so far earlie days but hers was nessesary because she fell and her previous pin in her hip (due to fracture) moved and was causing her pain … your only as old as you feel!

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